Winning is better than just “taking part!”

Young stylish businessmanSince the dawn of the professional era in sports the focus for the spectator has generally been on the spectacle of the event, whether it be football, motor racing or even darts. And as media has become more sophisticated and accessible there is hardly a gap when sport of some kind is not available to be watched and enjoyed.

So you can imagine the outcry across pubs and sitting rooms across the country when ITV decided that switching from the last tension-filled game of the French Open final wasn’t a priority so they turned it off. A “spokesman” was quick to point out that things had gone “… over the scheduled broadcast time etc etc” … but cynics may suggest that there was some technician sitting in front of a darkened console, who was not interested in tennis, who merely just flicked a switch according to the roster he had in front of him instead of actually thinking about the result of his action – after all, public relations aren’t his responsibility.

Perhaps there will be a different, tennis-loving “techie” on duty at ITV while Wimbledon is on.

Gone are the days too, when the result of a match tended to be played along the lines of the Olympic Creed, “The most important thing … is not to win but to take part …” This won’t sit well with many supporters of some teams at the World Cup in Brazil. You won’t get much of a smile from Roy Hodgson’s lads by telling them that it was only a game, and wasn’t it nice to take part?

Professionals who strive for success in any field will tell you that winning is everything. Even in the hospitality trade, success is measured in results and successful results usually translate into profits. Jon Rutter and his team of professional stocktakers can show you many examples of this truth. You can make the best soufflé in the world but if you’re not selling it for a profit it’s not contributing to your success.

Occasionally some strive for success without proper planning or attention to detail and then are found wanting. Like the holidaymakers who thought that climbing up a mountain in the Nevis Range was a bit of a stroll and had only packed their enthusiasm. They had to be rescued. If you happen to find a pair of flip-flops on the side of a Aonoch Mor sometime, they will be the ones a rescuer chucked away in anger as he had to carry their owner down on a stretcher.

But planning and strategy, while vital in any business, can be a bit like smoke-and-mirrors if you’re not careful and want to give the impression of prudential management, while in reality nothing changes. The prime example is the FIFA Exco (sport, again) who have decided that the recommendation of the Ethics Committee should be adhered to and that the awarding of bonuses should be banned. So they have stopped taking bonuses. Instead they have given themselves a 100% pay rise.

One punter commented, “Nice work if you can get it … but why do we even have FIFA Exco members being paid a salary? Oh yes, it’s for the love of the beautiful game.

Grandpa, can I print you some lunch?

Can you imagine this email going out?

“Dear Jon Rutter – we have had a lot more elderly customers in our restaurant lately and some of them are “chew challenged” so please can you ensure that your stocktaker adds the new “smoothfood” products to our inventory. Chef will send through the menu choices later. Oh and we also need to budget for one of those 3-D things so we can print their food out for them – sincerely Restrauteur, from Pull-the-Other-One Diner”

Starter, entree, mains & dessert!

Starter, entree, mains & dessert!

Some German scientists/cooks have developed gel-food using molecular gastronomy as an alternative to folk who find it difficult to chew their food. The process works by taking the real McCoy and then using Heston-style alchemy turning it into easy-to-swallow gel that is then put through some kind of 3-D printer to present the food in the shapes and colours the normal dish would look like. The report is not too clear on how it works but I suspect that it is much the same as a cookie cutter might operate – put in the ingredients and pop out the finished article.

However, regardless of how much they paid the photographer though, the finished product doesn’t look like it would tickle the old taste buds. Just like taking a pill as a substitute for an entire meal in science fiction movies didn’t seem to appeal to everyone either. I wonder if this will take off?

What might take off, however is the trick an American brewer has revealed that allows a person to drink without getting drunk! Jim Koch says that taking a teaspoon of yeast before you drink will stop you getting drunk. He adds that taking in dry yeast isn’t too palatable so suggests that it can be added into yoghurt. He is also quick to point out that the process doesn’t completely eliminate the effects of alcohol, just reduces it.

Apparently the yeast transforms the alcohol into carbon, hydrogen and oxygen molecules so before the alcohol reaches the brain it is effectively “neutralized” before it causes drunkenness. Which is fine for people who do not suffer from gluten intolerance – for those who do, moderation is still the key!

Publicans might have to ask their stocktakers to source a good stock of yoghurt and dry yeast for their patrons so they can also offer this remedy to their punters. Some would be forgiven in thinking that this concoction now gives new meaning to the term “gastro pub.”

Even supermarket chains have taken to using ‘science’ to attract their customers and sell their wares. Have you ever wondered why, after a few weeks the item you always found in aisle 6 has been moved to a gondola in aisle 2? Or that the size of mayonnaise bottle you really want is on the bottom shelf and the packet of flour your family uses now appears next to bottles of beetroot instead of with other baking products?

The answer is all down to the marketing schemes and tactics psychologists suggest the supermarkets use to keep us buying things we don’t really want, or things that we weren’t thinking about but end up filling our trolleys with. And beware the red stickers – they doesn’t always mean a “special discount” – they can also mean “danger, higher price!”

Some shoppers prefer to forego science and technology and stick to a shopping list, eat what they like and drink in moderation – yeast free!

It’s all smoke & sundials …

nor in Llanfair PG

nor in Llanfair PG

Maybe he was just trying to compete with the speed with which Amazon delivers groceries. And he was so close to his depot too, only to have his journey cut short by the unfortunate accident he caused – trashing five other vehicles and a house. For all one knows the Tesco driver had been told to ‘shake a leg’ that day.

Perhaps the driver had been told about Amazon pulling out all stops to compete in the grocery-delivery business and that they were going to take on the big supermarket chains. Amazon boast that if a customer places an online order by 10am they will receive their delivery by dinnertime. And if you shell out more that £35.00 there is no delivery fee!

The report states that the driver was treated for shock. Perhaps the other vehicle-owners and the people in the house didn’t need treatment, but the report wasn’t that clear?

After last week’s revelations about the possibility of glasses with lines on them to indicate the amount of units in them, another marked glass has made its appearance. This time stocktakers can relax as it may not make up too much of their customer’s inventory they have to budget for as it won’t be compulsory. A pair of friends have perfected the ultimate range of “sunglasses” only not the type you wear on your face.

This is a sundial-on-a-beer-glass. Which is great news for those folk who are drinking outside, in sunny weather and somewhere along the 51st parallel of latitude who don’t have a watch or a mobile with a clock on it. So it is great if you happen to be in Canada, Germany or even Kazakhstan (not sure how popular it will be there…) – or anywhere else along that line of latitude you’ll be fine. The trick is knowing which way to align the glass so that it will accurately indicate the time. Jackie Jones quite rightly reflects that “there is nothing else like it on the market.” It does NOT come with a compass attached, so you’ll have to BYO.

Jon Rutter and his team of stocktakers have no need to worry about this time-telling-beer-glass being added to many clients stock, though. As the further north they go the possible usage of this quirky item wanes. The Scots won’t be able to enjoy at all, even when the sun does come out over Edinburgh, because they’re on 56°N.

How do you say it

Listen here!

The locals in Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwll-llantysiliogogogoch (affectionately, and most sensibly known as Llanfair PG by the residents) have launched a voluntary project of making their town a non-smoking zone, even outdoors! Predictably, the smokers lobby group ‘Forest’ is reported to be ‘fuming’ but the Anglesey council said that the scheme had been ‘widely welcomed.’

But this raises another question that doesn’t appear to have been answered – what about the e-ciggie proponents? Can they ‘power-up’ in Llanfair PG and will ‘Forest’ fight in their corner because there is no real smoke?

Social media could go ‘viral’ …

0833-business-1100021594-10182013Nearly a year ago we made the point that like it or not, social media is here to stay. Some folk use it much more than others – either as tools to help their business, others, merely as a means to stay in touch with gossip and frivolous communications with friends.

One person (and maybe there are others too) use it as a form or revenge to vent their ire on bad or non-existent service. The case in point is when a Bristol graphic designer ordered and paid for a PS3 console from a Gumtree advertiser but his item never arrived. And when he couldn’t get hold of the ‘seller’ he realized he’d been conned out of his money. The police felt that there was little hope of ever catching the conman so Mr Joseph used his unlimited O2 contract to extract his revenge by sms. Having the conman’s mobile number he merely copied and pasted the entire works of Shakespeare into one message and sent it to him – all with one click. Mr Joseph’s iPhone automatically breaks the message down in over 29 000 messages of 160 words and merrily sends them on their way.

So if you happen to spot a Gumtree ad where someone is selling a “fully functional mobile that recites all Shakespeare’s plays” perhaps it would be the conman trying to relieve himself of an sms deluge.

One of the most well-known, some would say notorious, sites that people consult about checking on good and bad experiences, is Tripadvisor. Laughing Buddha owner Jin Cheng tells of how he spent years building his reputation on Tripadvisor but seems to have only negative reviews now owing to his ‘losing it’ with his customers and having 43 patrons walk out en masse without paying after the row over service. Police have commented that it is a ‘civil matter’ – some might suggest to the Kent Police that events were decidedly uncivil.

So with the Laughing Buddha’s decided lack of humour going viral in the most negative way, consider how a social media trend has had the opposite result and raised over £8m for charity. The idea of ladies with no make up,  posting ‘selfies’ on the internet was the unique idea of Fiona Cunningham. But it went further by her urging some friends to make a donation to a cancer charity when posting a ‘bare-faced’ picture and then issuing a challenge to some other friends. She said she was inspired by Kim Novak’s decision not to wear make up to the Oscars and she just took it further.

The recent good news the Chancellor declared also went viral – the news that the alcohol duty escalator was scrapped and the price of beer coming down spread pretty rapidly. The news was being ‘Tweeted’ as it happened so those sitting in pubs and following events knew about it straight away and probably ordered a celebratory pint immediately.

Jon Rutter and the team of professional stocktakers welcome this news with their customers – and they are also working on getting their own “How our stocktaking service can help YOU!” video on YouTube to spread the word too.

It seems that using social media is the effective way to share all types of information, not at all “Much ado about nothing,” it’s more about dealing with a tempest. We have Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and more, is there a social media platform named ‘Shrew‘ yet?

Would your best friend tell you if your breath stank?

pressing Social Network iconWhen you’re in a good relationship it’s an unwritten rule (a ‘given’) that honesty and openness are part of that relationship. So this premise can be attached to the relationship that you should have with your accountant, or tax consultant, or solicitor. Or your stocktaker. But it is a two way street – you’d be expected to be open and honest with them in the same way they can be with you. So when they give advice and tips on how best to run your business, if you had a good relationship, you’d take it on board.

Some would say that getting involved in social media, like Facebook and Twitter would be outside the average stocktaker’s brief, it would also be true to suggest that if they mentioned something that would help, or hinder your business, it would be wise to consider it.

Take David Ford for instance, his business was doing so badly he was about to close his doors but decided on making an appeal through Facebook and in one day his business increased 40-fold! What we’re not clear about is where David got the idea to use social media to turn things around. It’s unlikely he had someone like stocktaker, Jon Rutter to help him. But someone gave him sound advice in the same way any good stocktaker would have done.

The adverse effect, however was visited on ex pub-manager Alistair Dempster who, probably acted against good advice. He started a campaign of defamation against his former boss. You’d have thought that over the course of the hate-campaign someone would have told Dempster that his “breath smelled” or something similar. Maybe he didn’t have any good friends. In any event, he ended up paying his ex boss damages and costs!

However, for an anonymous chef, something that really did smell so bad that he decided to blow the whistle about it, was the way one NHS Trust outsourced the preparation of meals to a caterer who delivers the “ready meals” to the hospital. The qualified chef is reduced to operating a microwave instead of preparing and cooking the food. He tells of many patients sending food back as inedible and then it all then gets chucked out anyway.

The whistleblower-chef has decided to remain anonymous for now in case it impacts his career prospects.

He goes to great pains to point out that most other Trusts don’t do this and that their food is fine. It would only be a matter of time and elimination before the responsible NHS bosses figure out who the culinary-mole really is. The query does spring to mind, though – why wasn’t the state of the culinary offerings widely Tweeted and Facebooked by the patients or their families before now? Perhaps they were concerned that their fare would be reduced to bread and water if they complained (the whistleblower hinted that bread and water would actually be more palatable than what is presently served). Perhaps a good friend advised them not to, and they listened.

One thing’s for sure, there was no reluctance of Tweeters to broadcast the news of Gordon Ramsay’s de-starring of his New York restaurant. He went on to say,“I started crying when I lost my stars. It’s a very emotional thing for any chef.” Maybe the Tweets from some of his patrons were also the cause of bringing tears to his eyes!

My greengrocer’s gone underground …

“I can get some veggies and micro-greens for you, Mate. Even fresher than the ones from Covent Garden! Oh no, Guv – these ones are from a special mate of mine who’s managed to get his hands on an old air raid shelter. He’s now using it for a farm. Yes, underground. But not just any old underground. This place is using hydroplanes or something. And he’s growing all the greens you’ll need and not even a slug’s bite on anything. He’s clever, this lad. There’s no sand and no pests and he uses a special light that makes things grow. And he’s got that Australian cheffie lass, Michelle Roo, on board too. Don’t roll your eyes like that, Rodney, this is the pukka deal!”

09419118b5It would only take about 15 minutes for Del Boy to scoot over to Clapham from the flat in Peckham to pick up a load of greens from his suppliers, Richard Ballard and Steven Dring. They have managed to secure an old air-raid shelter and have embarked on a venture that will revolutionise the growing of herbs and vegetables right under the heart of London. Michel Roux Jr has teamed up with these entrepreneurs in setting up this garden that is aiming to produce top quality fresh herbs, vegetables and flowers that have never seen the light of day during the growing process. The proximity of this underground farm also ensures a pest-free environment and greatly reduced “food miles” owing to its central London location. It’s the sort of hare-brained scheme Del Boy would have been proud of – if only he’d thought of it first!

But it might have been Del Boy’s advice some landlords followed. Instead they possibly ignored the good advice of their stocktakers and decided to screen Sky Sports matches without the proper commercial viewing agreement in place, have been hit with a total £19 000.00 bill by the courts for their indiscretion. This detail would be one of the things that Jon Rutter and his colleagues would advise their customers to factor in to their planning. For those who provide sports coverage for their customers, this case proves the absolute necessity to plan carefully and ensure that all the correct licenses that they need are in place.

Stocktakers all over would agree that strategy and planning in the Industry never cease – especially with the news just out that April will see the implementation of minimum pricing of alcohol in supermarkets and shops. While some might argue that low supermarket prices have been factors in keeping people out of pubs and restaurants, with the advent of this move, those same pubs and restaurants might need to up their game in their plans to attract punters to their premises back by offering value for their £. Pubs and premises all over are trying different things from grabbing a pint at nine in the morning at a service station pub, to the round-the-clock-drinking rules that many are trying to get changed. In Blackpool, for instance, some are advocating early morning restriction orders preventing sales between 3 am and 6 am. Others are petitioning a relaxation of rules during the World Cup so that punters can enjoy watching the matches in their favourite pub.

It was jolly inconsiderate of Sepp Blatter to arrange the World Cup to be held in a time zone that causes so many problems to English fans and their publicans. I mean, who is really geared up to start watching a match at 11 pm? But it’s probably a good thing the PM has intervened and overruled Norman Baker’s refusal to extend pub hours.

There could have been a lot of miserable fans being chucked out the pub at closing time with the score on 1-0 in England’s favour!

You smell like an orchard … have you been drinking?

Pressed lemon flavoured beer!

Pressed lemon flavoured beer!

There is a London restaurant that is offering a three-course, 500-calorie meal for slimmers. Is this in response to the eternal cry of those seeking to lose a few pounds … “I can’t go to any restaurant because everything on the menu doesn’t fit into my diet?” Or is it a ploy to lure publicans from all over the country to dine in London because the CEO of the British Institute of Innkeeping has said that results of the recent survey should “… act as a wake-up call to the industry …?”

This report describes many landlords as “chublicans” because their lifestyles have made them obese. Some would argue that Tim Hulme’s words come too late because for years and years insurance underwriters have regarded workers in the Industry as high risk and slapped a loading onto any premiums – not only because of their exposure to alcohol but also because of the “unhealthy lifestyle” and diet. Well, at the Balcon, you will get beautifully presented dishes with hardly any calorific count that will satisfy most dieter’s needs. So on the strength of the research survey, don’t be surprised if you happen to see your local publican dining there on his day off in order to heed “the wake-up call” (they don’t happen to mention the cost of these low-cal dishes, though).

Stocktakers will have to add another column to their spreadsheets if the latest “must have” item is embraced by publicans whose customers have a sweet tooth. This might prove to be especially popular with the designated driver as they can have-their-beer-and-eat-it and walk out stone cold sober, too. The Germans have come up with beer-flavoured jelly beans. And pretty popular they are too by all accounts. These non-alcoholic sweets come in a variety of flavours and more are also being contemplated. Just bear a thought for the coppers on the roadblock breathalyzing everyone on whom they can smell booze. The designated driver might have scoffed a whole plateful, smell like a brewery and be as sober as a judge.

At the other end of the scale, popularity of a beer that is flavoured like fruit is also gaining momentum. The cops at the roadblock will REALLY be confused now. Chaps can smell like an orchard but might not be capable of putting their hand in their pocket! They say this is what technology is doing to improve the choices of customers.

Technology has also evolved to such a point that chaps like Jon Rutter and his team do know how to differentiate between everything that’s going on in the market place and what’s really necessary in order to keep their customers profitable and supplied with the correct choices and items. They have it all on their laptops and tablets, available at a moments notice for editing, scrutiny or consultation. No more bulky briefcases filled with reams of paper to be lugged from car to office and back.

But, there are times when “old-fashioned” paper still has its place – when tablets and technology is useless as illustrated in the short video, “Paper is not dead.”

Innovate … or go backwards!

Innovate!

Innovate!

Richard Branson has expressed the view that “if you aren’t innovating, you’re going backwards.”

Now that all the fuss about the “new-year-resolutions” has died down and everyone is back to normal, creative stocktakers all over the country are planning strategies to continue to help their customers stay in profit in spite of indications from some that people have less money to spend on going out to pubs and restaurants. So people like Jon Rutter and his team are determined not to let their 2013 efforts be “good enough” for their clients. Results show that regular stocktaking provides the accuracy and experience needed that helps improve a venue’s profitability, minimises waste, and enables the owner to concentrate on the key role of running the establishment. But using a stocktaker like Rutters doesn’t absolve the owner from the need to come with their own ideas to innovate.

We’ve all seen the videos that have gone viral on social media about men proposing to their sweethearts, or the flashmob announcements etc. Recently there have also been couples using these means to announce to their family the arrival of a child. The most recent is the couple in Toledo, Ohio who have produced a horror film type trailer announcing the “Bun-in-the-Oven … Coming June 2014.” Instead of just posting a message to their family saying, “Relax, we’re pregnant” this was a clever way of turning the announcement into something unusual and memorable. The video has had over 135 000 views and people are sharing it all over social media.

An innovative landlord, restrauteur, club or guest-house owner might consider making their own unusual and innovative video clip to announce something. And the wonderful thing about the way social media works is that even if something is not produced by Pinewood Studios or a professional videographer, if it’s clever and a quirky enough to get someone’s attention, it will be “liked” and “shared” and “advertised” with little or no effort made by the originator of the video. Today, using mobile phones and some basic free-editing software, anyone can make and publish a video. All it needs is for someone to think a little bit differently to the way they have been and then to have the “oomph” to try something different. So, landlords, don’t be surprised if your stocktaker comes to you with an idea about producing a short video clip of your chef making his special, or of the local choir singing in the grounds of your garden to advertise your community involvement – they’re just thinking “out the box” for you for 2014!

One wrong way of “thinking-out-of-the-box” was when Michael Gearty supplied a Dreambox decoder to a Nottingham pub. The set top box allowed Sky Sports coverage to be shown via an internet connection. The problem was, there was no Commercial Viewing Agreement with Sky Business and Mr Gearty is now watching TV from a prison cell. It has been reported that over 1500 licencees have been convicted for showing Sky Sports without a commercial agreement.

There’s innovation and there’s incarceration – the difference is stark!

(PS: There’s no license needed if you produce, publish and broadcast your own video!)

Smartphones. Just the thing for smart shoppers

Mobile phoneHow things have changed. It wasn’t that long ago when mobile phones were just that – phones. Nowadays using that mobile gadget to make a phone call is becoming increasingly rare. It’s like an add-on extra to the hand-held computer that keeps the user in touch with their world by email, social media, Skype and so on. You can even see where you are in a town, and also where you need to be, by launching the maps application. It also helps you find the shortest way of getting from A to B.

It didn’t take long for big business to latch on to the power of the internet some years ago by launching their online shopping services. And while some have worked really well there have been some horror stories of hidden costs, wrong items delivered and even cases of virtually nothing delivered as “the warehouse didn’t have stock” leading to the hapless shopper having to nip out anyway, to do what they were hoping not to have to do in the first place – go shopping.

But with all the problems that might have been associated with the big guys online shopping, there is a new move afoot that may just help the High Street businesses. The concept is the same. Shop online, but shop using local suppliers. The idea is to get local business who wish to participate to register with Hubbub and then residents in an area can see who’s available that they can buy from. Fishmongers, delis, butchers and others ply their wares via this website. All that has to happen now, is that all the local shops participate – otherwise you’ll be using that maps app on your smartphone to find a shop that sells what you need instead of having it delivered!

Image: John Nyberg

Image: John Nyberg rgbphotostock.com

Another great use for smartphones is seen almost daily in supermarkets and stores around the country. People are using the “calculator” function more and more. Even those folk who grew up as the generation that learned their multiplication tables by rote are using this function. Simple calculations have been taken away from the public by clever merchandisers. Gone are the days when it was easy to work out which cheese was cheaper by checking the price per kilo. Now there are all types of packaged goods in differing quantities. Like £2.80 for 190g … so how much is that compared to the brand advertised at £4.49 for 350g? Out comes the smartphone to see which is the best deal.

The poor stocktakers! How do they stay in touch without things like computers and complex formulae to keep the playing fields level? Jon Rutter and his team probably don’t have much use anymore for pieces of “arithmetic paper.” They must love that Σ symbol on their spreadsheets that works out the formula automatically. And it’s not only cheese that’s been causing a fuss! There has been a bit of a hoo-haa recently with supermarkets advertising “half-price” wine, when in fact that appears to be just marketing lingo.

Yep, things have changed! Get out the smartphones, and start comparing prices!

Like it or not, use it or not … social media is here to stay!

Social media is regarded by some as a waste of time. They take the view that, “I don’t do Facebook or Twitter. They’re rubbish!” While others view them as a means to spreading the word about the business or a message that they’re trying to portray to the public and their potential customers.

The bad news for the detractors is that whatever their sentiments, social media is here to stay and they might as well accept and even embrace it. For those who are already “sold” on it, they’d better learn to use and exploit the possibilities or be left behind.

Image by Diego Eis: eyesmiles.tableless.com.br

Image by Diego Eis: eyesmiles.tableless.com.br

Social media and its spread was highlighted this last fortnight during the build up to the Wimbledon finals and also will be in the run-up to the the arrival of new Duke or Duchess of Cambridge. Within seconds of an event’s occurrence, the news hits the streets and there’s no retraction that come quickly enough if the details are not completely accurate or if they’re not presented in the way that isn’t totally compliant with what the PR machines dictate. For instance, the moment John Inverdale made the disparaging remark about Marion Bartoli’s looks, Twitter erupted with comments and outrage and he had to issue a “grovelling apology” which might even not have prevented his early retirement from the commentary box.

And even as the grin was rising on Ewan McKenzie’s face in Brisbane, the rest of the world knew that Robbie Deans had been axed as the Wallabies Coach – before even the news wires had updated their websites.

Social media DOES work and it is a force to be reckoned with, embraced and utilised, rather than pooh poohed. So much so that an Enterprise Lessee has even launched their own pub version of a social media, called “Pub Network” that is aimed to help pubs engage more with their customers. The site enables pubs to create their own profiles and is seen as a way of letting their customers know about their latest events, offers and promotions. However, one wonders whether those who have successful social media sites will forego them in favour of the new Pub Network – personally, I would use both, as I’m sure the new network could also work and achieve the aim for which it was set up.

With all this marketing and promotional effort going on, I’m convinced that stocktakers like Jon Rutter and the lads take things like planning for social media into account when they give advice and deal with planning strategies of their clients. There was an excellent article in the Morning Advertiser this week that dealt with the need to use a qualified stocktaker and the services they provide in order to be successful in the trade (not, incidentally, commissioned by Rutters nor anyone else) but highlighting the need for business people to use those expert and proficient in the trade in order to make things work out well.

As the article pointed out – you wouldn’t get your car serviced by an unqualified mechanic, would you?

In the same way, those who advise that social media can work and if they have already it made it work for them, should be listened to … or will businesses listen to the mantras of a few years ago when they said, “this Facebook thing will never take off.” They were wrong.

Over 1 billion Facebook users must be viewed as a potential market. As could 500 million Twitter users sending 340 million tweets per day. So, potentially, Pub Network could be the next biggest thing in Britain. However you view it, people like Rutters and their customers will need to take various social media into account in getting the word out to their prospective clientele as to what’s on the menu, what the specials are and what other news there is … because if they don’t someone else will. And right or wrong, the public seem to be paying attention to what’s out there in cyberspace!